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  • Vision disorders.
     
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  • Vision disorders -- Case studies.
     
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  •  The Routledge handbo...
     
     
     
     MARC Display
    The Routledge handbook of visual impairment / edited by John Ravenscroft.
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    Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2019.
    Subjects
  • Vision disorders.
  •  
  • Vision disorders -- Case studies.
  • ISBN: 
    9781138085411 (hc.)
    Series: 
    Routledge international handbooks
    Description: 
    493 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
    Contents: 
    Cover -- Half Title -- Series Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- List of contributors -- Acknowledgements -- List of abbreviations -- Chapter 1: Introduction and synthesis of themes: the editor's perspective -- Introduction -- Conclusion -- Note -- References -- Part I: Introducing and understanding the profile, sociological and psychological impact of visual impairment -- Chapter 2: Global data on vision lossImplications for services -- Introduction to global prevalence and causes of vision loss -- Vision impairment in children -- Implications and challenges -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3: Psychological representation of visual impairment -- Introduction -- Compensatory hypothesis -- Auditory processing -- Somatosensory processing -- Olfaction -- General-loss hypothesis -- Impact of perception on higher cognition -- Critical periods for visual development: evidence fromsight restoration -- The metamodal hypothesis of computational (non-sensory)brain organisation -- Cross-modal plasticity: cortical reorganisation or unmasking? -- Molyneux's question -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 4: On being blind -- Introduction -- Conclusion -- Part II: Cerebral visual impairment/cerebral visual processing -- Chapter 5: Cerebral (cortical) visual impairment in children -- Introduction -- The creation of vision by the brain -- Where is the "picture" of what we see? Is it out in front of us, or is it in our minds? -- What is going on inside the brain of the child with CVI? -- Ten ways in which children can be visually affected by CVI -- A "thinking in threes" approach to the subject of CVI -- Aspects of cerebral auditory impairment that can compoundthe difficulties of CVI.
    Empowering affected children, their parents and carers by skilled teaching about the specific effects of CVI and how to deal with them -- Thumbnail sketches of a range of CVI case studies -- Additional visual difficulties described by those affected andby parents -- Can cerebral visual impairment be masked? -- Can CVI present with features of an alternative diagnosis? -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6: A personal perspective on CVI -- Introduction -- A CVI journey -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 7: Assessment of visual processing functions and disorders -- Introduction -- Case 1 -- Case 2 -- Case 3 -- Clinical assessment of atypical visual functioning for educationand rehabilitation -- Conclusion -- References -- Part III: Education -- Chapter 8: Trends in low vision education -- Introduction -- A brief history of early low vision education servicesin the United States -- Legislative mandates -- Curriculum guidelines -- Composition of the population of children with low vision -- Criteria for entitlement to education services -- Advances in educational research related to low vision education -- Technological advances and low vision education practice -- Availability of qualified teachers -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 9: Formal and non-formal education for individuals with vision impairment or multiple disabilities and vision impairment -- Introduction -- Individuals with vision impairment: trends, formal andnon-formal education -- Micro-level approach -- Differentiating the content -- Differentiating process and product -- Differentiating the learning environment -- Macro-level approach -- A case study -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 10: Transition from school to higher education -- Introduction -- Transition from school: why is it so important? -- Education and transitions: "access to learning" and"learning to access".
    Bioecological development and progressive mutual accommodations -- Individual agency -- Inclusive practice and adjustments -- Planning successful transition -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 11: Career education for studentswith visual impairments -- Introduction -- The career development model -- Barriers and challenges -- Solutions -- Career education activities -- Assessment -- Conclusion -- References -- Part IV: Sport and physical exercise for people with visual impairment -- Chapter 12: Teaching children who are deafblind in physical education, physical activity and recreation -- Introduction -- Communication and deafblindness -- Teaching physical education to students with deafblindness -- Collaboration with the team -- Socialisation -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 13: Movement and visual impairment -- Introduction -- Teaching physical education to students with visual impairments -- Instructional approaches -- Support personnel -- Teaching for generalisation -- Fitness activity modifications -- Assessments -- Inclusion example: Brittany -- Conclusion -- References -- Part V: Assistive technology -- Chapter 14: Foundations and recommendations for research in access technology -- Introduction -- Foundational concepts -- Designing a research plan -- Conclusion -- References -- Part VI: Understanding the cultural aesthetics -- Chapter 15: Classical philosophies on blindness and cross-modal transfer, 1688-2003 -- Introduction -- The study of cross-modal transfer -- Lockean blindness in the study of philosophy -- Eighteenth-century philosophies on blindness and touch -- Contemporary replications of Cheselden's study -- Material philosophies after Gregory and Wallace -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Chapter 16: In vision and touch,pictures trigger equationsfor surfaces and edges -- Introduction.
    Tactile pictures -- What is a picture? -- Bird and windmill: drawings from EW -- Studies on blind people and space -- Surface equations or images in the head -- Mental images -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 17: Art, visual impairment and the gatekeepers of aesthetic value -- Introduction -- Institutional theories of art and the art world -- The disabling leverage of normative appraisal -- Convention and creative expression -- Visual impairment, art and the discourse of "real super humanism" -- Ableist gatekeeping of aesthetic value -- Convention revisited: how one artist's liberty becomes anotherartist's failing -- Pluralistic conceptions of capability and non-normative forms of appreciation -- Art as an exemplification of the needlessness of passing -- Forward-facing reflections -- Classificatory and evaluative approaches -- The funding implications of normative forms of art appraisal -- The need for creative responses to ableist affirmations -- References -- Chapter 18: Using expressive movement and haptics to explore kinaesthetic empathy, aesthetic andphysical literacy -- Introduction -- Choreo-haptic experiments -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Part VII: Socio-emotional and sexual aspects of visual impairment -- Chapter 19: Social-emotional aspects of visual impairment -- Introduction -- Early social development -- Early social-emotional development of children with VI -- Interacting with peers and the expanding social world -- Role of adults -- Vision and social interaction -- Views of CYP with VI -- Promoting inclusion and the development of social-emotional competence in educational settings -- Peer culture and peer influence -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- References -- Chapter 20: Self-esteem of people with visual impairment -- Introduction -- Definition of self-esteem -- Construct of self-esteem.
    The importance of self-esteem -- Self-esteem of children and adolescents with visual impairment -- Self-esteem of young adults with visual impairment -- Strategies for self-esteem improvement of people with VI -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 21: Human mate selection theory -- Introduction -- Attributes males seek in potential female partners -- Attributes females seek in potential male partners -- Short-term liaisons -- Summary of gender differences in selection of mates -- Conclusion -- References -- Part VIII: Orientation, mobility, habilitation and rehabilitation -- Chapter 22: Modern approaches to orientation and mobility -- Introduction -- Issues affecting habilitation and rehabilitation -- Changes in the visual need population worldwide -- UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) -- The emergence of habilitation and rehabilitation -- Technology and habilitation -- Prospective research, training and practice issues -- Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 23: Measuring vision, orientation and mobility in the wild -- Introduction -- Choosing what to measure -- How to measure functional vision for O&M -- Conclusion -- References -- Part IX: Recent advances in "eye" research and sensory substitution devices -- Chapter 24: An overview of humanpluripotent stem cell applications for the understanding and treatment of blindness -- Introduction -- Differentiation of hPSCs -- Ophthalmic disease modelling -- Cell therapies using hPSCs and derivatives -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Chapter 25: Technologies for vision impairment -- Introduction -- Vision prostheses (bionic eyes) -- Sensory substitution devices -- Conclusion -- References -- Part X: Aging and adulthood -- Chapter 26: Employment and visual impairment -- Introduction -- A lifespan perspective -- Historical context -- Sheltered workshops.
    Additional Author: 
    Ravenscroft, John.
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